Grilled Peaches with Mint Pesto

Summer is coming to a close, but don’t worry, we’ve got your back. Squeeze a little more sunshine out of the last grilling days of the season with this super easy dessert!

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To make 2 peaches (4 halves) you will need:

1/2 cup Mojito Mint from Terra Farms
1/2 cup Roasted Almonds from Going Nuts
1/4 cup Alpine Wildflower Honey from Beeland
Peaches, just ripe from Cherry Pit

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  1. Wash the fuzz off of peaches.
  2. Cut peaches in half and take out the pits. Lightly coat the peaches in olive oil and place on a hot grill.
  3. Crush or blitz your mint, almonds and honey together (to loosen things up, add a drizzle of oil as the blender makes dessert pesto magic).
  4. Remove peaches from the grill after roughly 4 minutes or until grill marks have appeared. If you want softer peaches, grill them for a longer amount of time.
  5. Scoop a healthy serving of your mix in to the middle of each halved peach.
  6. Serve simply like this or with a scoop of ice cream!

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Around the table… with Beeland

 

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Springtime means the bees wake from their dormancy and get to work pollinating all the lovely flowers, fruits, vegetables and more that we enjoy all year!
Here at the Calgary Farmers’ Market, Beeland is bee-central and our provider of both products and knowledge. I asked Morley, the owner of Beeland, to share some info on his products and what we can do to support the bees this spring.

  1. How did the story start for Beeland?

In 2000, I bought 125 acres of wilderness property in the Columbia Valley region of BC with the intent of retiring. In 2004, I approached a local beekeeper to put 6 bee hives in this spectacular alpine region. That was the beginning of Jubilee Mountain Apiary Ltd, which was named for Jubilee Mountain where the property was located.
In 2006, we purchased the dilapidated Spillimacheen Trading Post, located on the highway between Radium and Golden, and began what has turned out to be a 10-year restoration and renovation project. The old trading post building was re-named Beeland Market, as a retail outlet for our honey.
Today, Beeland Market has grown to include not just honey sales, but has expanded into a complete gourmet store, coffee bar and a new cafe opening in April 2017.
Jubilee Mountain Apiary Ltd. now operates anywhere from 200 to 300 bee colonies, employing 3 full time beekeepers, and an additional staff of 6-8 persons in retail, food production and food service.

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  1. What is your favorite thing about being a part of the Calgary Farmers’ Market family?

Our role at the market is more than selling honey and bee products; we are very much filling an educational role to the public on the reality of bee life. Most people are concerned with the life and survival of bees and their role in our lives, particularly as pollinators.
I try and explain the fragile nature of our environment and how it sustains bee life, and as a result of that, human life. Beeland, in its very important physical location at the Calgary Farmers’ Market, has become a critical educator to the public in this very important area of apiary agriculture.

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  1. What’s your favorite item that you produce? Why?

Our honey changes year to year depending on the climate. The most unique honey that is produced is definitely Snowberry Honey from one alpine location. The Snowberry plant grows exclusively in the Rocky Mountain area and has a tiny pink flower that blossoms in late June. This tiny flower is very high in nectar, however its blossom coincides with a wet June climate. Because of this, the bees are not able to gather the nectar each year. The production of this honey is very small, and is sold out instantly when we are able to present it in September.

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  1. Do you have a go-to recipe that highlights your product?

Beeland market uses honey in our line of Beeland sauces. This product line now ranges from BBQ sauces, Honey Hot Sauces, and other food products produced with honey.

  1. Words of Wisdom you live by:
Bees are one of the few creatures that sustain the lives of human beings, they take nothing away from the universal creation. They are in perfect harmony with nature and life of the world. Human beings should be able to learn from them and live our lives in the same perfect peace and harmony that bees do.

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  1. What’s your favorite thing to eat in the market that’s not from your booth?

Margarita’s cheese perogies, drizzled with butter and Beeland honey. It’s a special delicacy!

  1. What are three quick tips about bees that you want to share with market guests?

1. Bees sustain life.
2. Do not spray dandelions, as dandelions are the first flowers in this climate that produce both pollen and nectar. This is the first food for the bees in the spring and it is critical for their survival. Eliminate all spraying of herbicides and insecticides. We must re-educate our minds that this flower is not a weed, but is part of a natural system that sustains life.
3. Lately, bee keeping has become a trendy hobby for urban-dwellers. We, as human beings must understand that bees are delicate living beings, and any aspiring beekeeper MUST ensure proper education and internship with a seasoned beekeeper prior to embarking on becoming one.

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Easy Easter Feast

A few things hop to mind when you think of Easter: chocolate bunnies, egg decorating, and ham.  Sure, there are other things that make up Easter, but in terms of food, these three things are pretty prominent.  We wondered how best to offer useful (and delicious) information and landed on: How to Roast a Ham.  It’s dead simple and is a sure-fire way to make every tummy at the table happy.
Plus, we just visited Greg and Bonnie Spragg’s pig farm.  When they offer you a ham, you don’t refuse.  In fact, you thank them gleefully because it’s the most beautiful ham you ever did see.
Ham Collage
Market-Sourced Ingredients

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Remember when we said it was simple?  You can’t get a whole lot simpler than three ingredients.  Yes, we know those ingredients don’t include brown sugar and mustard.  There are a few pretty traditional (and still yummy) ham glazes kickin’ around, but we wanted to give you something a little more off-the-beaten-path than the Cola or Pineapple Ginger recipes.  Plus, the only fruit that’s really “in-season” right now are apples and that’s just a little too close to the old-fashioned ham and apple sauce dinner we used to get at Grandma’s.  Why not try something a little different?

Preheat oven to 325F.  Using a very sharp knife, score fat in a diamond pattern.

Meanwhile, stir amber honey with blueberry balsamic.

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Place ham in a shallow roasting pan just big enough to hold it. Roast in centre of preheated 325F oven, uncovered, allowing 18 to 20 minutes per pound for a bone-in ham.

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Roast ham for 45 minutes before beginning to baste generously with the mixture.  To form a rich glaze, continue brushing with mixture every 15 minutes. Save any remaining glaze. Remove ham to a platter and tent with foil for at least 15 minutes.

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If you want to make a bit of a sauce for your ham: add 1 cup of vegetable broth and any remaining glaze to the pot you roasted the ham in. Stir pan bottom vigorously to scrape up all of the flavor-packed browned bits. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat burner on the stove (you can transfer from roasting pan to smaller pot at the point to make it less cumbersome). Then reduce heat to medium and boil gently, uncovered and stirring often, until slightly reduced, from 5 to 10 more minutes. Pour over sliced ham. Meat will keep well, covered and refrigerated, for a week or more.

Now, we know that ham is often served with traditional sides, like scalloped potatoes.  And if you’re an accomplished or ambitious cook, homemade scalloped potatoes are the bomb.  But as we can guess, you’re all very busy and since we’re selling this as an Easy Easter Feast, we suggest checking out the vast and tasty selection of ready-made agrio boxes at the Cherry Pit.

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They offer everything from roasted or quick saute vegetables to easy dress and shake salads, all made in-house by their very talented vegetable butcher.  Easter dinner could not be easier.

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Want to learn more about Greg & Bonnie Spragg?  Check out our farm feature!

Eat Your Way to Love

Valentine’s Day is a bit of a fluffy holiday, what with its Cupid-drawn arrows flying around swirling pink hearts, lush flowers and rich chocolates being flung at a loved one, and sappy cards that don’t really embody the true beauty of love.  It can all be a little overwhelming to even the most savvy of gentlemen (and lady).  But we here at the market, l-o-v-e the food aspect of Valentine’s Day; it’s a clear opportunity to try your hand at a new recipe to impress, vamp up a tried-and-true favorite, or really spoil your guy or gal with decadent and delicious fare.  Aphrodisiacs are at the top of the food list come lovers day and we’d be remiss if we didn’t share some of the sexy and enticing foods you can find in one stop at the Calgary Farmers’ Market.

Aphrodisiacs go way back and it’s not just about flavor, it involves the shape and texture of certain foods to arouse the mind, making them not just about taste, but also a cerebral experience.  Whether or not these foods actually turn you on is still to be proven, but if it’s tasty, why not give it a try?  Here are our top six.

First up: Oysters

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Oysters are perhaps the most famous of aphrodisiacs; while they are visually suggestive, oysters are also high in zinc and have a reputation for being great for love and fertility.  Our friends over at Blu Seafood have fresh oysters on hand for you if you want to stick with the notorious aphrodisiac.  Owner, Brian Plunkett, is also a trained chef so if you aren’t a fan of slurping them down raw, he can suggest just the right way to prepare them to suit the mood.

2. Chili Peppers

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An exotic reputation and a bright red color, chili peppers kind of just look like love. But scientifically, they stimulate endorphins, speed up heart rate and make you sweat, which all mimic how you feel when you’re say…. hot and bothered.  Gull Valley Greenhouses and The Cucumber Man are prime spots at the market to pick up some peppers to heat things up.

3. Avocados

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We’re not sure exactly how lustful an avocado is; it could be the sensuous shape or the rich, creamy flavor of the fruit that warranted it being dubbed as an aphrodisiac.  But when its reputation goes as far back as the Aztecs, you can’t argue with history, right?  We won’t.  And neither will Cherry Pit or Blush Lane Organics, both brimming with ripe, ready-to-indulge avocados.

4. Chocolate

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What would Valentine’s Day be without chocolate?  Do you have to give your love bug a heart-shaped box of mass-produced chocolates?  No!  In fact, we invite you to stop by Papa Chocolat to spoil your taste buds with silky smooth, unique and sensual flavors like dark cayenne or lavender cream, hand-crafted  by Bernard Callebaut himself.

5. Honey

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Birds and bees ring a bell?   Sweet and sticky, honey is chalked full of healthy vitamins that are said to increase desire.  In fact, the word ‘honeymoon’ got its name from mead, an alcoholic beverage made from honey given to the happy new bride and groom.  We have plenty of honey to be found around the market from the delicious Alpine Wildflower Honey at Beeland, Nixon Honey at Innisfail Growers Co-op, Chinook Honey at LA CUCINA, and Saskatoon Berry Honey from the Saskatoon Berry Farm.

6.  Cinnamon, Cardamom, and Nutmeg

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Nothing like spicing up your love life, literally.  Cinnamon, cardamom, and nutmeg all have ancient aphrodisiac roots spanning from Arabia to China; their warming properties really seem to heat things up if you know what we mean.  Swing by The Silk Road Spice Merchant for some exotic ways to enhance a meal or that cup of tea you’re enjoying all snuggled up by the fire.

Whatever way you’re celebrating Valentine’s Day, we hope it’s a lovely occasion for you and your sweetheart.  And if you need a little more inspiration, check out our Valentine’s Day event and Enter to Win a Romantic Getaway to CRMR‘s Emerald Lake Lodge!

Holiday Charcuterie Board

With all of the holiday parties and get-togethers, friendly gift-exchanges over rum and eggnogs, family dinners with goodies galore, and New Year’s Eve upon us, we wanted to provide you with an easy way to share delicious food no matter what festive event you’re attending.  A charcuterie board is, we think, the yummiest way to enjoy a variety of cured meats, mustards, cheeses, preserves, pickles, bread and crackers.  You’d be hard-pressed to glance at a menu in Calgary without often finding an in-house cured charcuterie on offer.  Gone are the days of a pile of salami and a chunk of havarti.  But does that mean you can’t make a mean charcuterie of your own? Absolutely not.  It’s easier than you think and there are plenty of options out there.  We’d like to show you how to throw together a spectacular spread in one stop here at the Calgary Farmers’ Market.

All you need is a big cutting board (or two) or a couple of slate slabs and a little sense of adventure…. because who doesn’t love going to a party and stumbling on something new and delicious?

Ok so let’s break it down.  A great charcuterie board has a number of delicious elements: meat, cheese, pickles/olives, preserves/jams/mustards, fruit, and bread/crackers.  Sounds like a lot?  Perhaps, but they will all compliment each other to create a symphony of awesome and your friends will appreciate that variety.  What’s that idiom?  Variety is the spice of life?  Yeah, that’s the one.

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So what kind of meat should you go for?  Anything cured is the simple answer.  So that means: pancetta, Proscuitto, salamis… we used the coppa and capicolla from Fresh DELIcious and the bison bresaola from Olson’s High Country Free Range Bison.  You can also include terrines, smoked salmon, and pâté too (we love the wild board pâté by Valbella Farms).

Ready for the cheese?  The best way to make your cheese selections is to think of balance.  You don’t want all ooey-gooey cheeses or a whack of rock-hard slabs for your guests to fight to enjoy.  Variety, remember?  Go for something like the award-winning extra-aged sharp Grizzly Gouda by Sylvan Star Cheese, an earthy Brie like the mushroomy Brie de Meaux, a triple creme soft-as-butter Brillat Savarin is a crowd pleaser, and always a blue cheese.  Never discount the sometimes pungent, stinky selection; there are LOTS of blue cheeses available. From super-stinky dirty-sock blue cheese, to milder blues like the creamy, tangy Saint Agur from the village of Beauzac in the mountainous French region of Auvergne.  We love the Moody Blue from Fresh DELIcious as it’s on the milder side and it has a subtle smoky undertone.  There are so many incredible cheeses to choose from; if you’re not sure, ask for a quick taste before you decide to take it home.

Pickles on a cheese plate?  Always.  The acidity of a perfectly pickled spear of Edgar Farms asparagus or snap pea or bean or carrot or OLIVES! Yes, pickles are a must.  Innisfail Growers has an impressive selection of pickled vegetables, choose your favorite.  Then there are olives.  Sure, not everyone loves olives.  But for those that do, they really love olives; no one is ever just on the fence about an olive.  2 Greek Gals and Soffritto have a good selection, so does LA CUCINA and Fresh DELIcious.  You have no excuse to leave them out.

No charcuterie board is complete without the preserves and mustards that compliment the cheese and meat.  It’s all about balance, remember?  A bresaola is best with a tiny dab of mustard, like the grainy Brassica mustard from Blu Seafood.  Fig jam is a common and very approachable accompaniment to almost every cheese; we added the Grand Marnier and Honey Spice Cranberry Sauce from Beeland to our charcuterie just to mix it up.  And their Roasted Nuts and Wildflower Honey is pure heaven on a hunk of blue cheese.

Fruit is also a great addition to any charcuterie board.  Figs, dates, grapes, strawberries, gooseberries, pears, even apple.  They pair well with the cheese and cleanse your palate before moving on to the next bite of “yum!”

Baguette or crisp crackers are the perfect vessels for your well thought out board.  Providing a rice cracker is must these days for your gluten-sensitive guests; we’ve gone one further and are offering the Raw Vegetable Flax Crackers from Healthy Delights.

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Only a few more notes: ‘fluff’ your meat selections, don’t just slap ’em down on the board to make your guests pick through the pile.  Don’t ever jab a knife into your wheel of brie.  Just don’t.  Provide knives for your guests to enjoy your wonderful cheese selection.  Thinly slice the fruit and bread, add dollops of mustard and preserves, and place pickles/olives around the board.  Also, it’s always nice to label your selections… unless you want to spend your night helping your guests navigate your charcuterie or listen to hushed “what is this cheese? what am I supposed to do with the honey? what the heck is this?!” whispers.  Throw ’em a bone and let ’em know what they’re enjoying.  You can even place a ‘menu’ of sorts in a frame beside your charcuterie to ease your guests’ into knowing what they’re eating and loving every bite.

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Canning Extravaganza!

It’s that time of year when we’re surrounded by incredible local produce at every turn, so much deliciousness we couldn’t possibly eat it all.  So can it!  We’ve received quite a few requests for canning recipes and guides, tips and tricks.  And while we are making every attempt to provide you with stellar answers, we must admit that we are not seasoned canners.  But does that mean we can’t enjoy the process of packing little morsels of summer into jars so we can pop a honey vanilla peach in our mouth in the dead of winter and be transported back to that perfect sunny day with peach juice running down your arm in the park?  No, it doesn’t.  And would we ever suggest that our loyal and fabulous customers shouldn’t try their hand at pickling vibrant green cukes that are meant for a last-days-of-summer-BBQ Caesar?  Never!  No, we believe there’s something beautiful in getting your hands dirty and giving it a go.  So, we rolled up our sleeves and jumped right in.  Strawberry Preserves, Honey Vanilla Peaches, and Dill Pickles… go big or go home right?  Wanna join us?   These are the things you’ll need.

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Market-Sourced Ingredients

1 Flat of Strawberries*

1 Case of Peaches*

3 Bags of Pickling Cucumbers*

3-6 Heads of Alberta Garlic (depending on how garlicky you like your pickles)*

*Items sponsored by Souto Farms

2 Heads of Beck Farms Cauliflower from Innisfail Growers

1, 500ml Jar of Nixon Honey from Innisfail Growers

3 Bunches of Dill from Blush Lane Organics

1 Bag of Pickling Spice and 2 Vanilla Pods from The Silk Road Spice Merchant

Canning Equipment Required:

*We purchased a home canning starter kit from Canadian Tire that includes everything you’ll need for years of canning ($50); it includes a 21 quart canner, a rack, jar lifter, funnel, lid lifter, bubble remover, 4 pack collection elite decorative jars with lids, original crystals pectin and recipe booklet AND an instructional DVD for beginners.

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Let’s start with the Strawberry Preserves.  As we stated earlier, we’re not traditionalists when it comes to canning AND we believe when you have such gorgeous seasonal produce, it ought to shine.  So, we did away with the traditional 4 cups fruit + 4 cups sugar, (we want to taste the fruit, not the sugar), and instead opted for the No Sugar Needed Bernardin Pectin.  Our recipe was simple:

1 flat of Strawberries

the black gold of one vanilla pod

juice and zest of one lemon

1/2 cup of apple juice

1 cup of sugar, and

1 package of pectin

*We followed the steps included in the pectin box.

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Start by washing the strawberries and rough cutting into smallish chunks.  Add to your pot with the lemon juice, zest, and vanilla.  Bring to a boil, add pectin, and bring back to rolling boil.  Add sugar, stir, return to a rolling boil for 3 minutes (as stated in the pectin instructions).  While all of this is happening on one side of the stove, you should have your mason jars, lids, and metal bands/rings sterilizing in the canning pot on the other side.  Funnel hot strawberries into hot, sterilized mason jars with 1/4 inch head space.  Top with hot, sterilized lid and place ring (or metal band) on (do not over-tighten).  Process the filled jars in your hot water bath (in canning pot) for 10 minutes. The lids will start to ‘ping’ and you’ll know they’re sealed.  As a disclaimer, these strawberries are called preserves, not jam, because they don’t fig up like a traditional jam… but they taste darn good and are perfect on waffles, ice cream, scones… yum!

Canning Collage 2

Now, on to the peaches!  If you’ve been to the market lately, you’ve seen the cases and cases and cases of peaches we have.  They’re fuzzy, sweet, juicy orbs of yum.  And what could be better in the middle of a freak snowstorm than pulling out a jar of honey sunshine to top french toast or make peach crisp or balk at Old Man Winter and eat them with a bowl of ice cream?  While they take a little more effort as they need to be blanched in hot water for 1-2 minutes (depending on how ripe they are), peeled, and quartered before soaking them in water with lemon juice… they’re worth it!  So, here’s what you’ll need:

1 case of peaches

a couple lemons (or the Bernardin Fruit Fresh if that’s your preference)

1 vanilla pod, and

1 500ml jar of Nixon Honey for a light syrup

Start by blanching the peaches in hot water for 1-2 minutes and then transfer to a sink full of ice cold water to stop the cooking process.  You don’t want to cook the peaches, just shock the skins off and seal in some of the nutrients.  Add more ice to the water to ensure it stays nice and cold as you continue with blanching the entire case of peaches.

Now the peeling.  Here’s where you can choose two based on your preference.  You can either half them and remove the pit, then peel the skins away and cut into quarters.  OR, you can peel the skin away and try to keep the slippery little peach in hand while you quarter the fruit away from the pit.  We actually found the latter to be more effective than the former, but it’s a personal preference.  These quarters are far from Del Monte perfect… but should they be?  Our hands made them and that kind of makes them yummier, no?

Place all of the peach slices in a sink of cold water with the juice of a couple lemons (or Fruit Fresh); this will help prevent browning.

Let’s get started on the syrup.  We opted for a light syrup as we wanted all three ingredients to shine equally and not be overpowered with a cloying honey sweetness.  We use 1 cup honey to 4 cups water (and used this ratio 3x times to fill all of the peach jars).  Heat water, honey, and seeds of the vanilla pod together until boiling.  Pour honey syrup in hot, sterilized jars stuffed with peaches (pack them in, but don’t squish ’em) with 1/2 inch head space.  Top with hot, sterilized lid and place ring (or metal band) on (do not over-tighten).  Process the filled jars in your hot water bath (in canning pot) for 25 minutes. (Ensure that all jars are covered by at least one inch (2.5 cm) of water; cover canner and bring water to full rolling boil before starting to count processing time).  ***Remove jars from water bath without tilting and place them upright on a protected work surface. Cool upright, undisturbed 24 hours; DO NOT RETIGHTEN screw bands.

Peaches can be enjoyed a mere week after… they do not require a long steep time like pickles.

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Ok pickle time!  So pickling is dead simple.  By this stage, we were a well-oiled produce-prepping, jar-sterilizing canning machine.  We decided to pickle cucumbers, cauliflowers, and green beans, though other great options are carrots, asparagus, beets, onions, or jalapeno peppers.  Here’s what you’ll need:

3 Bags of Pickling Cucumbers

3-6 Heads of Alberta Garlic (depending on how garlicky you like your pickles)

2 Heads of Beck Farms Cauliflower

3 Bunches of Dill

1 Bag of Pickling Spice

Start by washing (gently scrubbing) the pickling cucumbers.  Slice how you prefer; we chose to do them two way: spears in quarters and coins.  Wash and cut cauliflower.  Peel garlic.  Place mason jars, lids, and metal bands/rings in the canning pot to sterilize while you’re making the pickling brine.

Our brine is made up of:

4 cups water

2 cups apple cider vinegar

1 cup white vinegar

1 cup coarse pickling salt

1/2 cup white sugar

*Some may find this brine too strong; you may choose to add more water but do not over-dilute the brine as this will affect the crispiness of the pickles.

Bring the brine ingredients to a boil.  Drop 4 cloves of garlic, a few fronds of fresh dill, and approximately 1 tbsp of Silk Road Pickling Spice into jars.  (We used 1 tbsp in 500ml-1L jars, and 2 tbsp in larger jars).  Pack your vegetables of choice into hot, sterilized mason jars and pour hot brine over them with 1/2 inch head space.  Top with hot, sterilized lid and place ring (or metal band) on (do not over-tighten).  Process the filled jars in your hot water bath (in canning pot) for 5 minutes.  Pickles will require approximately 4 weeks of fermenting time before they’re at their best.

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We sure got a lot done!  So, do you need to do all three of these in one day?  Absolutely not!  In fact, it’s a pretty aggressive undertaking.  We do, however, think you should take a stab at one of them.  There is a plethora of delicious canning recipes out there; you can find some of the ones we love on our Pinterest Canning Board.

What will you be canning this year?  Do you have an interesting recipe to share with us?

*A quick note on processing times: times will vary depending on the altitude you live at.  For the purpose of our recipes, we have stated altitude-appropriate times for Calgary, Alberta.  If you live elsewhere, you can consult this very useful altitude chart from Bernardin.

Honey Thyme Glazed Trout

If you’re a fish-lover, there are few things more beautiful than fresh, wild Steelhead trout or a deep red Ahi steak or a glistening halibut filet….. *ahem*  we may be fans of the beauties showcased at Blu Seafood.  There’s nothing quite like perfectly crisped-skin trout fillets; with a flavor so delicate that they really don’t need much to make a delicious (and healthy) dinner.  This recipe is dead simple with only four main ingredients:  a squeeze of orange, and a dollop of honey, and fresh sprigs of thyme, it lets the trout shine and takes all of 12 minutes.  And, with the outstanding selection of ready-made salads and grilling vegetables from Cherry Pit, a complete meal can be whipped together in less time than calling for take-out.

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Market-Sourced Ingredients

1 Steelhead Trout Fillet from Blu Seafood

2 tbsp Honey from Buzz Honey

Fresh Thyme from Terra Farms

Juice of half an Orange from Cherry Pit

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Sea Salt

Freshly Ground Black Pepper

Your Choice of Prepared Salad or Vegetable Sauté from Cherry Pit

Cherry Pit Salads

Quickly whisk together a mixture of orange juice, honey, fresh thyme, sea salt, and freshly ground pepper.

Rub the salmon with oil and season with salt and pepper. Place in hot pan, skin side down, approximately 6-8 minutes.

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Gently flip and continue to cook for about 3 minutes.  Flip back onto skin side and brush the tops of the fillets with a few remaining minutes of cook time.  *Do not brush skin side of fish with the honey-thyme glaze as this will cause it to burn terribly.  Take care not to overcook the fish.

Serve skin side up over whatever incredibly easy (and yummy) Cherry Pit side you chose to enjoy; serve the remaining glaze on the side.

Trout Collage

Alternatively, if you’re more of a grillin’ kinda gal or guy, this trout can be done on the grill (just be sure to oil the skin well to prevent it sticking to the grates).

Trout